Law

What are the Consequences of Not Paying Child Support?

Child support is a set amount of money that one parent pays to the other and is intended to help pay for the needs and expenses of their child. The amount to be paid as child support is determined considering each parent’s income, the cost of living in their respective households, and other factors.

After a divorce is finalized, it is expected that both parents will contribute financially to meet the needs of their child or children. While both parents share equal responsibility for providing for their children while they are married, child support laws protect the needs of children after divorce by ensuring that both parents contribute financially. After a divorce is finalized, one parent continues to pay child support to the other whether they cooperate in raising their children or not. If you want to raise the child support money you receive, the assistance of a Milwaukee divorce attorney must be required.

The consequences of Failing to Pay Child Support 

If one divorcing spouse does not pay their share of the child’s expenses, they will likely wind up owing a substantial amount in back child support payments. They may also face jail time or legal repercussions for failing to provide for their children’s needs. 

Here are some common consequences of failing to provide child support:

  • Financial penalization or imprisonment

Lying about one’s income on a child support modification application is a Class C misdemeanor in Wisconsin. If either partner does not disclose all of their financial information, there could be a monetary fine or jail time. For example, in Wisconsin, failure to provide accurate information on the Application for Child Support Modification can result in a fine of up to $350.00 and up to 90 days imprisonment.

  • Tax intercept

Federal and State Tax intercepts are enforced by the Child Support Enforcement Agency. This agency works with the IRS and Wisconsin State tax service to collect un-paid child support. If you don’t pay child support, the CSESA files a lien against your property, which includes real estate and anything you own. You can also have your tax refund intercepted.

  • Suspensions

The Wisconsin Department of Transportation (DOT) or the Wisconsin Department of Corrections can suspend your driver’s license and/or your professional license. The DOT in Wisconsin suspends your driver’s license after you have failed to pay court-ordered child support payments for at least six months.

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